Somehow I Managed

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Chatham Bars Inn

Last week, I had the amazing opportunity to work with Bob O’Neill (former executive director of the ICMA), presenting a workshop for the Massachusetts Municipal Managers Association on Cape Cod. My role was to share findings from my research on life as a local government manager. We spent time as a group learning and brainstorming about how to stay motivated in this profession.

The managers I surveyed in my research had a wide variety of suggestions for maintaining motivation at work – making sure to look at the big picture, using humor, changing communities, embarking on passion projects that do not need any outside approval, making routine things better or more innovative, and spending time mentoring staff.

Several managers noted that when they felt that they were losing their motivation, they switched communities to make a fresh start. One manager said that he stayed motivated by learning new ways to present the budget, or setting a new goal such as applying for the GFOA distinguished budget award. Another manager noted that “It is helpful to look at every recurring project with an eye for how to make it better.”

Having passion projects is a common strategy. “Undertaking a pet project helps break the monotony in the municipal cycle” said one manager. Another agreed: “I try to have a signature project each year that isn’t Town Meeting dependent to revitalize my primary purpose for doing this work – making life better for the citizens I serve.” Another manager took the “CSI” approach: “Take on a ‘cold case’ issue and try it again if enough time has passed,” he suggested. Continuing on the “cold” theme, a colleague knew where to look for his next passion project: “There are many projects in the freezer – that’s when you don’t have enough room to put them on the back of the stove.”

When you have been in the same position or career for a long time, it can be tricky to find ways to learn and grow. Attending professional development workshops is an obvious way to stay motivated. Another is to become a subject matter expert. One colleague who moved to a coastal community prone to flooding decided early on (I think on day two when the first winter storm hit) that becoming an expert in emergency management would be a necessity as well as an opportunity for her. Taking on new departments to supervise, and changing reporting relationships in your organization can be a way to learn new skills. One manager agreed to take over supervision of the IT department with no first-hand knowledge of the subject matter as a way to keep work interesting.

Scanning the landscape to identify signature issues on the horizon that need to be reckoned with was the strategy of one local manager. In that vein, I recently listened to a podcast (Gov Love of course) about the future of parking garages when autonomous vehicles are common (sorry behemoth concrete structures, you will need to be re-purposed). I keep thinking how the landscape in our town will change as a result, and that we better start planning.

Connecting with peers and fostering long-term relationships is an exceptional way to stay motivated and resilient. Participation in the ICMA and state associations is a common way to do this. One colleague noted that “I feel like the camaraderie of the membership along with the professional resources that are provided make both organizations (MMMA and ICMA) exceptionally valuable.” (Is it me, or is camaraderie the hardest word to remember how to spell?)

I’m sure many local government professionals will identify with this manager, who says “My involvement with MMMA has been a highlight of my life. The things I learned helped me to do a better job. The friends I made supported me through some dark times when I needed it most. I tried to return that in kind.” Many said that their colleagues were some of the closest friends they had, and that attendance at association meetings is critical to nurturing those relationships. Finally, any number of colleagues have created kitchen cabinets, with whom then learn, grow, commiserate, celebrate and grieve. Said one manager: ” I have a small group of colleagues, all of us entered the profession at about the same time. I consider them to be my personal board of directors.”

This “Somehow I Managed” research, and this blog, are my passion projects. The work keeps me engaged and connected with peers – a big source of motivation for me. I urge you to explore new strategies to boost your resilience and stay motivated at work. If all else fails, plan a great vacation for a time when you reach a big milestone – the end of Town Meeting or the adoption of the city budget for example. Having something to look forward to is a great way to endure the seemingly endless number of meetings about stormwater!

If you would like to fill out the survey send me a note! I would love to hear your stories and keep the project moving. And Bob, how about we take our show on the road?!

Let’s practice.

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